Concussion

 

Medfield Soccer does not support heading in children on U12 teams and under.  For U13-14 teams, heading may be introduced but we do not advocate any repetitive practice sessions of heading the ball.

If a player gets a head injury during a practice or a game, coaches need to watch him or her for possible signs of a concussion.  If the player experiences one or more of the following signs or symptoms, he or she should be be referred to a health care professional to determine if the player has a concussion:

  1. Appears dazed or stunned
  2. Is confused about events
  3. Repeats questions
  4. Answers questions slowly
  5. Can't recall events prior to the injury
  6. Can't recall events after the injury
  7. Loses consciousness (even briefly)
  8. Shows behavior or personality changes
  9. Headache or "pressure" in the head
  10. Nausea or vomiting
  11. Balance problems or dizziness
  12. Fatigue or feeling tired
  13. Blurry or double vision
  14. Sensitivity to light
  15. Sensitivity to noise
  16. Numbness or tingling
  17. Does not "feel right"
  18. Difficulty thinking clearly
  19. Difficulty concentrating
  20. Difficulty remembering
  21. Feeling more slowed down
  22. Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy
  23. Irritable
  24. Sad
  25. More emotional than usual
  26. Nervous

Players should be seen in an emergency department right away if he or she has:

  1. One pupil (the black part in the middle fo the eye) larger than the other
  2. Drowsiness or cannot be awakened
  3. A headache that gets worse and does not go away
  4. Weakness, numbness, or decreased coordination
  5. Repeated vomiting ro nausea
  6. Slurred speech
  7. Convulsions or seizures
  8. Difficulty recognizing people or places
  9. Increasing confusion, restlessness, or agitation
  10. Unusual behavior
  11. Loss of consciousness

If it is determined that the player did experience a concussion, the coach will need a note from the doctor saying it is okay for the player to resume practices and games.